Skip to main content

About your Search

English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
stanford ph.d won for his work in economics along with ucla professor lloyd shapley. cornell bernard is on campus. >> reporter: the phone rang at professor roth's house 3:30 this morning but he slept through the phone rang again, he picked up it was stockholm calling saying he had won the prize in economics. he spoke to reporters and got a standing ovation. he is a stanford economist, 60-years-old and pioneer in match making series and formulas, he redesigned matching up doctors with hospitals, organs with transplant recipients and students with the right schools. >> economics has somehow a reputation among some parts of the public as being boring about prices and statistics. but, i've always thought of economics as being not just part of the social sciences but humanities because it gives us a window into people's lives at some of the biggest crossing points. >> reporter: dr. roth says he did not expect to win it was a big surprise. he shares the award and the million dollar prize with dr. lloyd shapley at ucla what do you do after winning the nobel prize? dr. roth says nothing spec
compete. in the guest spot is richard sanders professor at ucla and stewart taylor junior editor of harvard law review, co-authors of the new book out today "mismatch." welcome, gentlemen. >> thanks for having us. >> thank you. >> richard, let me start with you. you say affirmative action places mirnlt students with underperforming scores in schools they're not qualified for, thus making it hard to pass exit exams and so they leave not fully prepared. >> yeah, it's important to keep in mind that we're not saying that students aren't qualified to be in college. it's which college they go to. so the idea is that if you are admitted to a school where your credentials are lower, say 00 or 300 points lower than classmates. the teachers teach toward the middle of the class and you're likely to learn less. there's an outpouring of research showing in the sciences, blacks and business panics have high attrition rates because of mismatch. in law school they're twice as likely to fail bar exams and there's a loss of self-confidence among students that receive it. >> i know toure will quest
knows. she's a political science professor at ucla and she is analyzing all these voters for this upcoming book it's called "the gamble" about the 2012 election. lynn, welcome. i'm fascinated by who these people are. you look at the calendar, 33 days to go here until the election. are they undecided because they really are just absolutely torn over who to vote for? or do they just not follow politics period? >> it's a great question. and i think people mistakenly believe that they're just torn. they're right at the middle. and one more piece of information is all they need to make up their mind when in fact the latter is true, they're not interested in politics and may not have real positions on issues they care about. >> you call them low information voters. here's another 40% according to this poll found that 40% could identify john boehner as speaker of the house. i do want to move on because in terms of the specificity that groups can really get down to in terms of who these voters, these undecideds are, this is from bloomberg business week, they say the high turnout
. a professor at ucla is 12 matched different economic ag working donors or students at schools. 1.2 million dollar prize was awarded four outstanding example of economic engineering. it continues a strong run of decades. economic stride was not part of the original set in the will but added in 1968. ashley: and the e.u. one it. that cheapens it. but congratulations. lori: i will reserve comment [laughter] ashley: that is my 310 days worth we have nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. >> we see up arrows today. we have three out of four last week selling on wall street. looking at analyst colleen this to upgrade their shares to the outperform rating from perform. look at toymaker hasbro. the holiday season it turns out goldman sachs is not so hot on this sector including mattel. being more cautious and neutral putting the celebrating on hasbro in particular that the spending per-capita people will spend less per person. and acceleration of boys' toys is dwindling. lori: the trade war heating up between the u.s. and china? we need to be concerned about doing business here? gordon chan
and i got dragged to this performance. it was a competition between ucla and usc. i thought it was going to be the most excruciating night of my life and by the end i was a huge dork. i was like, this is amazing, can we go meet them? it was a famous upset because ucla beat usc or vice versa. it went down in history. when i bring it up with people that know this world, they were like you were there, this famous night. >> that song, a capella, what's happening there. >> singing this complicated game. you have to wait. somebody else is singing the song and you have to wait for a lyric you know and take that lyric and start singing differently. there's all these rules to the game we play. >> for people who do not understand what a capella means. >> not linguine. >> not barber shop quartets, it's a somewhat new thing. >> like boyz ii men. >> pan okay, you would be the drums. >> solo. >> only one person singing the melody and words. you're creating an orchestra with just voices. >> the human voice. >> we're so excited. this movie, "pitch perfect" opens at a theater near you. >> you are the cut
that we did at ucla, back in 1988, because of the height difference between michael dukakis, the democratic nominee and george herbert walker bush who is four or five inches taller than him. we to build a bubble in front of the podium for governor dukakis to stand on so he would appear relatively the same height. it is little things like that that we have to deal with. >> tell us about a little thing like that as far as this debate. the podium or the temperature in the room. >> well, you know, we try to keep the temperature at 65 degrees. i always tell my wife and daughters when they come, bring a pashmina because the hall is very, very cold. has to be with the lights and cameras. we try to keep it there. sometimes it varies. the podiums will always be the same size for the men and women who participate in these debates. and so, you know, we sit down, we work with the staff of our professional staff and then they -- each of the candidates also has a staff that is here. we walk them through, showing how things will go. as you know, we'll take both candidates through this afte
promise to come back as a doctor and put their health come i went to ucla and then to harvard medical school where became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an er doctor at eisenhower medical center. i am living proof that the american dream. but for too many people, the american dream is endangered because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their saving and too many students can't afford college. and congress and our congress on have lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they are focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points of looking out for themselves and wealthy donors. congresswoman bono mack's response is more at the same. more bickering, more partisanship. and were looking out for yourself instead of us. instead of listening to people in proposing world solution, the congresswoman replies on the same partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or fixed income. watch tonight how many times you pass around empty phrases like
years of the reagan administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in oct
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)